8 weeks of crazyness

20 Mar

Wow, I have not written in a looooooooooong time.
The last 8 weeks were really busy, so let me summarize what happened…

January

After the memorable Coast trip I ran for the Presidency of AIESEC in Kenya. The Elections gave the position to the current president to execute the role for another year.
These are just two sentences. They are short and do not at all explain the amount of talks I had with Alumni and members, weeks I worked on the strategies and emotions involved in the whole process. Especially the learning cannot be summarized, self awareness, speaking skills, playing smart, listening to whats behind the words.
Only people who went through a similar experience, can now nod their head wisely.

Thanks a million times to Emma and Gathu!

February

The idea of sitting at home or in the office without knowing whats next does not fit well to me. So Plan B had to be pursued with as much force but dignity as possible.

I visited the country, met members and leaders, interns and alumni. During the week I saw the potential and formed my vision. 3 Speeches later…
President of AIESEC in Uganda!
The 14th of February! Valentine’s Day! My new valentine, Uganda!!
I was proud, delighted and humbled. The amount of trust that is put into me, is incredible. Zu Deutsch “Vorschusslorbeeren”.

The last two weeks of February I went to Tunisia to attend AIESECs Global Leaders Summit (read more here), to learn on my new role, discuss the strategic direction of AIESEC. Of course also legislation (110 countries in one room), External Sessions (I met Robin from DHL again after nearly two years) and AI Elections had to happen to make IPM my so far contentwise best AIESEC Conference.

March

The last two weeks I was in Uganda, for the National Conference. Part of the agenda was to chose my MC team, meaning the people who will lead AIESEC Uganda with me from July. Out of 11 applicants I decided to work with 6 and open 2nd round applications for 3 more positions.
This team is soooo on point and every single individual really skilled and has great results to show!
Just a short summary of the Conference: We really lived the East African dream… Tanzania and Kenya had big delegations and lots of worldviews were challenged!

On the way back from Kampala I stopped for an LC Visit in Moi.

Right now I am sitting at the airport, waiting for my flight that will take me to Westafrica for AfroXLDS, the most important AIESEC Conference on the conference.
More about this trip and the conference later…

A very famous quote of Steve Jobs (link to video) really fits well to the ups and downs of the last 3 months.
“Looking back I can see the dots connecting!”
My time in Nairobi is exhausted and I will now get to know another country in East Africa. Quite probably that the impact I can bring in 1 year to Uganda will be much higher than to Kenya.
The personal learning that the new role in Uganda seems to be a lot higher and I cant wait to get to know another culture!

And the beauty of Uganda is hard to describe in one sentence and after only 3 weeks there. It is mystique, hot, jungle. The skin is darker, the sun hotter. More bananas, less stress.

Let me quote a guidebook:
“Uganda’s reputation as Africa’s Friendliest Country stems partly from the tradition of hospitality common to its culturally diverse populace, and partly from the remarkably low level of crime and hassle directed at tourists. But this amiable quality extends beyond the easygoing people. Uganda’s eco-friendliness is atte…sted to by the creation of six new national parks under the present administration, as well as a recent mushrooming of community-based eco-tourism projects at the grassroots level.
Uganda is where the East African savannah meets the West African jungle. Where else but in this impossibly lush country can one observe lions prowling the open plains in the morning and track chimpanzees through the rainforest undergrowth the same afternoon, then the next day navigate tropical channels teeming with hippo and crocs before setting off into the misty mountains to stare deep into the eyes of a mountain gorilla”

More later!!!

Uganda’s reputation as Africa’s Friendliest Country stems partly from the tradition of hospitality common to its culturally diverse populace, and partly from the remarkably low level of crime and hassle directed at tourists. But this amiable quality extends beyond the easygoing people. Uganda’s eco-friendliness is attested to by the creation of six new national parks under the present administration, as well as a recent mushrooming of community-based eco-tourism projects at the grassroots level.
Uganda is where the East African savannah meets the West African jungle. Where else but in this impossibly lush country can one observe lions prowling the open plains in the morning and track chimpanzees through the rainforest undergrowth the same afternoon, then the next day navigate tropical channels teeming with hippo and crocs before setting off into the misty mountains to stare deep into the eyes of a mountain gorilla

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